MONAGHAN PEOPLE STILL THE MARRYING KIND, CENSUS RESULTS REVEAL

28 September 2012 No Comments by The Northern Standard

Marriage is still a popular option for Co Monaghan people, with 50.5% of the eligible population in married relationships, latest findings from last year’s Census have shown.
The latest Central Statistics Office publication of Census 2011 results reveals that 23,727 of people aged 15 and over in the county are married. The 50.5% percentage is significantly higher than the national average of 47.3%.
There is correspondingly a lower than average percentage of single people in the county, a total of 17,970 (38.2%). The national average is 41.7%.
There are 1,149 divorced Co Monaghan people, which corresponds to the national average of 2.4%. Of these, 412 have remarried. Thirty per cent of male divorcees in the county have gone down the matrimonial pathway again, but only 23.8% of females, and in both instances the remarriage rate is significantly lower than the average pertaining nationally.
5.9% of the population – 2,765 – are widowed. The national average in this regard is 5.3%.
Co Monaghan has 5,048 people living alone – 8.3% of those living in private households. There are 2,027 of these aged 65 and over, and of that figure, a very significant proportion – 61.7% – are female.
There were 15,590 families in the county on the night of the Census.
The latest Census publication, “Households and Families – Living Arrangements in Ireland” – is available on the CSO website at www.cso.ie/census
Deirdre Cullen, Senior CSO Statistician, said the latest report “provides an in-depth picture of households and living arrangements in Ireland”.
“It presents new analysis on divorce and re-marriage, an examination of the family cycle of married versus co-habiting couples, as well as new information on the living arrangements of lone parents, divorced people and one-person households.”
Ms Cullen described the living arrangements of families and households in Ireland as constantly changing, and said the report provided new information on “this intriguing aspect of Irish life.”

Comments are closed.